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Henn Kim

If you’re looking for previous end-of-year reviews, please refer to my book lists from 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018.

For anyone who had been following previously and was curious as to why I didn’t get around to my book list in 2019 — the long and the short answer of it was simply that it was a year of reckoning (and a heck of a year to come before 2020). This is also an arduous process, typically taking me several days to capture all of the quotes and thoughts into something that I’ll be happy with.

My sibling went…


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Episode 5: As strategists, a big part of our role is being asked to ‘just find an insight’. In this episode, Shann and Rachel explore if great planning always needs a consumer insight? If not always — when and where should it be applied?

Below you’ll find an unedited transcript of the above episode. If this sounds like something you’d be interested in listening to please subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud and Podcast Addicts!

Shann 0:00
Hello, hello, welcome to this new episode of the other thinkers. I’m Shann.

Rachel 0:04
And I’m Rachel.

Shann 0:05 So Rachel, today…


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Episode 4: A persistent question for anyone who understands the power that our position offers in a producer economy; where we have a role in and influence the wants and needs of others.

Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud and Podcast Addicts!

Shann 0:00
Hi, everyone, welcome to the fourth episode of the Overthinkers. I am Shann.

Rachel 0:05
And I’m Rachel.

Shann 0:06
So today, Rachel, we’re gonna talk about a pretty big question is working in advertising an ethical dilemma for us?

Rachel 0:14 And I mean, I feel like this is a very difficult question. But my…


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Fernando Cobelo

If you’re looking for previous end of year reviews, please refer to my book lists from 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017.

Books have always served as an escape for me. An almost meditative trance is induced as I have no choice but to watch the story unfold, one word at a time. In a year of ever-increasing anxiety, this has been a calming touchstone — a reminder to take and accept every day just like I would a book, one step, one page, and one chapter at a time.

“Reading is a form of prayer, a guided meditation that briefly…


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Günseli

If you’re looking for other end of year reviews, please refer to my book lists from 2014, 2015, and 2016.

I spent a lot of time this winter holiday thinking about this list and whether or not to dedicate the time to it. While I’m a voracious reader, I’m a laborious writer (this process requires about two full days of writing). In reviewing previous lists, I was reminded that it is the act of archiving in and of itself which is the joy and the purpose . We ingest so much disposable information in our daily lives and feeds that…


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Reading by Ylena Bryksenkova

If you’re looking for other general reading recommendations, here’s my book lists from 2014 and 2015 for reference.

This year’s total came to 47 books (I’m in the middle of three, so while I wanted to round up I’ve played the pessimist here).

While it’s about ten less books than last year, I’m chalking it up to significantly less vacation days, an international move, wedding planning, and this years election (which attached me to a constant drip-feed of news).

Regardless of the metaphorical headcount, I am still a firm follower of the (what I’ve dubbed) The Rick Webb Reading Methodology


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Lauren Callaghan

Last year, I wrote a brief essay on why 2015 was the first year I was excited to be a woman on the internet. The basic thesis is the internet is a more powerful tool than ever for women. With the growth of the social internet, there’s been a proliferation of content (and places) for us to celebrate and share our unique perspective. This creates more fodder to feed the positive feedback loop: women see stories from other women (or women like them), learn from and build upon that experience, and thus also feel encouraged to share.

Margaret Cho recently


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(via)

As ever, I am inspired by Diana Kimball’s excellent annual book list. I think now that I’ve done it twice, it is officially an annual tradition.

This year’s total came to 63 books. That is about five less than last year, but I’m chalking it up to significantly less vacation days and a more harried work year depriving me of leisurely lunch hours. Also, I am a firm follower of the (now dubbed) Rick Webb reading methodology, which states:

“Don’t try and read what you, or others, think you should read.”

There a lot of things in my life where…


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I think before we delve into the how of we decided to make the product inclusive, I believe it’s important to address why we decided to build Hackaball in the first place. While Stuart and Tim have both written extensively on the full origin story — from nascent intern project to fully fledged side-project, there’s also a design story to tell. But there is also a certain amount of market (and cultural) context that solidified our reasoning to take it to Kickstarter.

“Everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer, it teaches you how to think.” …


Following some amazing coverage in The Economist and Creative Review this month, we’re also very excited to be featured in the next issue of Offscreen Magazine. In Offscreen, we’re sharing the story of our journey to Kickstarter — and all of the peaks and valleys in between.

As an addendum to that story, I wanted to share 7 key takeaways from our Kickstarter journey.

1. You don’t know if anything is going to be 100% successful until it’s up for sale

Unlike software, we had no real incremental way of determining whether or not Hackaball would actually sell as a physical product. Whilst we did a lot of research and validation with kids and parents, Kickstarter was the ultimate validation for our product. This was something that was much more difficult to do with a physical product that requires greater up-front investment.

2. Don’t just be a product manager, be an experience manager

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The unboxing experience is core to the Hackaball brand — how can we make kids comfortable with taking it apart and putting it back together?

It’s important to remember that your brand isn’t defined by a logo, but rather the whole experience. Throughout our process, we didn’t just have to think about one aspect of the design at any given time; we put a…

Rachel Mercer

Currently building my own business. Former Head of Strategy R/GA NY. I believe writing makes you a better thinker; this is where I develop my thinking.

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